Drug Free Music

I’m conducting an experiment on myself to see if I can enjoy music made by sober musicians. This means no alcohol or prescription drugs or illegal drugs. Looking primarily for rock acts, but any genre, any time period is fine.
Good luck.

Music and drugs are like sex and drugs. Its cool sober but when you’re fucked up you can do it 10 times better.

thanks dude. only need about 49 more to provide an experimentally viable list.

Good luck.

Music and drugs are like sex and drugs. Its cool sober but when you’re fucked up you can do it 10 times better.

yeah tryin my best lol
The band gives an anti-drug message near the end of the video clip of their live performance of "I’m your captain (Closer to home)."

1972 Grand Funk wanted to split from manager Terry Knight. Terry Knight shows up at the Madison Square Garden in order to confiscate all of the equipment. The show was supposed to be broadcasted and the tickets were meant to support a drug rehabilitation center. Therefore the local police didn’t stop the concert.

I guess you like setting yourself up for failure and disappointment
Try Metallica and Sublime… Neither of those bands ever drank or did drugs! haha

did a little research and couldn’t find anything on their actual use. they seemed to emphasize hard drugs, alcohol and cannabis were not mentioned. do you know any more about them?

well, i’ve long known that Sublime is drug free – just look at the album art on Second Hand Smoke, but didn’t Metallica recently fall into addiction? I’ve always thought that’s why their recent work has sucked.
music without drugs would have been boring and not nearly as inventive as it could have been.
In fact, all you need for this "experiment" is 2 albums…

1) Master of Puppets
2) Saint Anger

Listen to those 2 albums, and you tell me the effect of booze on music lol.

In fact, all you need for this "experiment" is 2 albums…

1) Master of Puppets
2) Saint Anger

Listen to those 2 albums, and you tell me the effect of booze on music lol.

st. anger was full of fag and fail. i hated that shit and wished them all dead after hearing it.

Before I look into that, which I’d love to do, since research is my profession, are you sure there isn’t an agenda behind this "experiment"?

After all, I truly wish that I could have somehow had fun as a young man without drugs. I have more than 25 years now without using drugs.

Before I look into that, which I’d love to do, since research is my profession, are you sure there isn’t an agenda behind this "experiment"?

After all, I truly wish that I could have somehow had fun as a young man without drugs. I have more than 25 years now without using drugs.

i was sober until i was about 18. since then, i have become a musician and have devoted my life to it. music defines me. however, it is a strong belief of mine that I would have never found music unless I had expanded my mind so to speak.

But what really bugs me, is that there has been almost no studies related to drugs and music. Most likely, it is because music is a difficult subject in itself and drugs are a difficult subject as well. So, because I have nothing to read up on, I am highly curious.

Music is different for everyone. I am absolutely positive that there are some badass musicians out there that don’t alter their mind whatsoever. But I can’t think of a band that I rank as one of the best that didn’t take intoxicants. I can hardly even name a sober band
goddamn. i dont think that post made any sense. ill comeback tommorow when im not hammerd and make it clearer.

but serioslyu dudes. i really want to know as much as possible about the connection betweens drugts and music. or fuck, psychoactives and art in general.

rock on OT

i was sober until i was about 18. since then, i have become a musician and have devoted my life to it. music defines me. however, it is a strong belief of mine that I would have never found music unless I had expanded my mind so to speak.

But what really bugs me, is that there has been almost no studies related to drugs and music. Most likely, it is because music is a difficult subject in itself and drugs are a difficult subject as well. So, because I have nothing to read up on, I am highly curious.

Music is different for everyone. I am absolutely positive that there are some badass musicians out there that don’t alter their mind whatsoever. But I can’t think of a band that I rank as one of the best that didn’t take intoxicants. I can hardly even name a sober band

goddamn. i dont think that post made any sense. ill comeback tommorow when im not hammerd and make it clearer.

but serioslyu dudes. i really want to know as much as possible about the connection betweens drugts and music. or fuck, psychoactives and art in general.

rock on OT

You identified very well a specific area of society that really needs some looking into. Like you, I wish there was more info readily available on this. And this kind of thing is really exactly what I love to study, while Sociology is possibly my favorite subject. To tell the truth, what you’re asking about is very close to studies I’ve informally done for many years, mainly through simple observation.

That’s a real tough one though, but I’ll see what I can do. It may take awhile, because tomorrow’s the Super Bowl and all.

What’s great too is my story is possibly very similar to yours, because I didn’t drink, smoke, or drug until I was in the Air Force at right around my 18th birthday.

Getting high on weed was certainly a great way to enjoy music for me for 5 years, until I decided to move on with my life.

Fathead was what I called a very good friend of mine, while I was stationed at F.E. Warren AFB in Cheyenne, WY.

He called me son though, boo.

You identified very well a specific area of society that really needs some looking into. Like you, I wish there was more info readily available on this. And this kind of thing is really exactly what I love to study, while Sociology is possibly my favorite subject. To tell the truth, what you’re asking about is very close to studies I’ve informally done for many years, mainly through simple observation.

That’s a real tough one though, but I’ll see what I can do. It may take awhile, because tomorrow’s the Super Bowl and all.

What’s great too is my story is possibly very similar to yours, because I didn’t drink, smoke, or drug until I was in the Air Force at right around my 18th birthday.

Getting high on weed was certainly a great way to enjoy music for me for 5 years, until I decided to move on with my life.

the more i think about it, the more i am realizing that this is a very tough subject because most bands and musicians don’t list on their website what drugs they take or don’t take. Andy McKee was fairly easy, it states on wikipedia that he has not touched illegal drugs, however it doesn’t mention alcohol which leads me to believe that he does drink. But LOLZILLA suggested tychomusic, and I only have his word that they are substance free as I was unable to confirm this by doing a search.

I didn’t have to spend much time looking for this stuff anyway. Hope you like it.

Although it doesn’t say he always tried to avoid drugs, the fantastic lead singer of AC/DC says that he didn’t do them, which is almost the same.


Dec 22, 2008

AC/DC singer Brian Johnson has something to do during downtime on the band’s Black Ice tour: The vocalist has signed a deal with Penguin Books to pen his memoirs, a collection of “thoughts and anecdotes” he’s compiled in his years as the singer of the Australian band. Don’t expect a tawdry tale like Motley Crue’s The Dirt, however, as Johnson’s 300-page manuscript will have a different tone. “I like humor a lot,” Johnson said, “and cars have been a big part of my life. I’m lucky enough that I’m able to buy some of the exotic ones. Instead of doing drugs, I did motorcars. I’m not sure which one is more expensive.” Stories in the book will likely include Johnson’s debut ride in a Concorde jet, his first auto race and that time he drove backwards for 9 1/2 miles because his gears were busted. No title or print date has been announced yet.

In the comment section of that link and article, Michelle says, "Angus has done very few if any drugs other than nicotine and caffiene" for whatever that’s worth, and she says, "Music acts these days could stand to learn a few things from AC/DC. You don’t have to be a cokehead or alcohlic to be famous."

I think it’s good to pause and consider the ramifications of the possibility that Johnson is telling the truth.

Ganja wanted me to make this about bands that don’t drink alcohol either, but I’m not really interested in that topic, so nothing I’ll post has anything necessarily to do with drinking.

I want to try hard not to get into any debates about legalization or decriminalization, so if I present some information that does appear to oppose that, it was only to maintain continuity. lol

Just for the record, I oppose decriminalization and legalization, but I support medical marijuana.

How rock’n’roll fell out of love with drugs
By Alan Travis & Sally James Gregory
Oct 27, 2003

Young musicians today are more likely than those of previous generations to decry the harm that drugs can cause, according to research in America.

The study, based on an analysis of drug lyrics in English-language popular music since the 1960s, was last week highlighted as one of the few pieces of good news in the annual survey by the European monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction, the EU’s drugs agency.

The research, published by the University of Texas at Austin, explodes the conventional wisdom that popular music encourages teenagers to abuse drugs. The author, John Markert of Cumberland University, Tennessee, says that although there has always been a generally hostile attitude towards heroin and other hard drugs, teenage listeners today "are being exposed to more negative images of marijuana and LSD than older listeners"…

In the 90s, several over 30s musicians, such as JJ Cale, Tom Petty and Sheryl Crow, released albums that lauded marijuana and were geared to an older, more marijuana accepting audience. They contrast sharply with the message from Biohazard’s 1994 Failed Territory – "another neighbourhood gets destroyed by the drug deal" – which attacks the systemic problem associated with drug use and is shared by nearly half of the 1990s songs analysed by Mr Markert.

"1990s music such as Biohazard’s sees nothing good with dope. Drugs are bad; there is no equivocation, no okay drugs such as marijuana or LSD and many of them link cannabis to other drugs such as cocaine as a gateway drug."

I checked though they may inspire bands not to use drugs, they weren’t free of them, and they "formed Biohazard for the purpose of expressing political viewpoints and discussing problems facing urban youth, which all of the members had experience dealing with themselves…Battling drug and alcohol abuse, inter-band strife, record labels folding, merging and abandoning them for more pop flavors, Biohazard staggered like a champion fighter, but never went down. During these difficult years, Biohazard succeeded in sticking it out together.’

There is a quasi-newscast here about Ted Nugent wanting to be Obama’s drug czar. According to this report, "Nugent has allegedly stayed away from drugs and alcohol during his career," and it starts at 3:45 into the video.

Therefore, for this subject of "drug free" rock ‘n roll, I believe it will be necessary to examine whatever we can find on the subject, and that’ll includes how Rolling Stone says he does "rain on the Summer of Love’s anniversary parade." Anyway, it’s not long, so I’ll include the whole thing.

But before deciding to read this or just skipping it, people should decide what credibility or relevance Nugent has in the light of his onstage rant, and there’s a video of it. I don’t think it completely disqualifies him.


Forty years ago, dirty, stinky hippies converged on San Francisco to "turn on, tune in and drop out"
By Ted Nugent
Jul 4, 2007

This summer marks the 40th anniversary of the so-called Summer of Love. Honest and intelligent people will remember it for what it really was: the Summer of Drugs.

Forty years ago hordes of stoned, dirty, stinky hippies converged on San Francisco to "turn on, tune in, and drop out," which was the calling card of LSD proponent Timothy Leary. Turned off by the work ethic and productive American Dream values of their parents, hippies instead opted for a cowardly, irresponsible lifestyle of random sex, life-destroying drugs and mostly soulless rock music that flourished in San Francisco.

The Summer of Drugs climaxed with the Monterey Pop Festival which included some truly virtuoso musical talents such as Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin, both of whom would be dead a couple of years later due to drug abuse. Other musical geniuses such as Jim Morrison and Mama Cass would also be dead due to drugs within a few short years. The bodies of chemical-infested, brain-dead liberal deniers continue to stack up like cordwood.

As a diehard musician, I terribly miss these very talented people who squandered God’s gifts in favor of poison and the joke of hipness. I often wonder what musical peaks they could have climbed had they not gagged to death on their own vomit. Their choice of dope over quality of life, musical talent and meaningful relationships with loved ones can only be categorized as despicably selfish.

I literally had to step over stoned, drooling fans, band mates, concert promoters and staff to pursue my musical American Dream throughout the 1960s and 1970s. I flushed more dope and cocaine down backstage toilets than I care to remember. In utter frustration I was even forced to punch my way through violent dopers on occasion. So much for peace and love. The DEA should make me an honorary officer.

I was forced to fire band members and business associates due to mindless, dangerous, illegal drug use. Clean and sober for 59 years, I am still rocking my brains out and approaching my 6,000th concert. Clean and sober is the real party.

Young people make mistakes. I’ve made my share, but none that involved placing my life or the lives of others at risk because of dope. I saw first-hand too many destroyed lives and wrecked families to ever want to drool and vomit on myself and call that a good time. I put my heart and soul into creating the best music I possibly could and I went hunting instead. My dream continues with ferocity, thank you.

The 1960s, a generation that wanted to hold hands, give peace a chance, smoke dope and change the world, changed it all right: for the worse. America is still suffering the horrible consequences of hippies who thought utopia could be found in joints and intentional disconnect.

A quick study of social statistics before and after the 1960s is quite telling. The rising rates of divorce, high school drop outs, drug use, abortion, sexual diseases and crime, not to mention the exponential expansion of government and taxes, is dramatic. The "if it feels good, do it" lifestyle born of the 1960s has proved to be destructive and deadly.

So now, 40 years later, there are actually people who want to celebrate the anniversary of the Summer of Drugs. Hippies are once again descending on ultra-liberal San Francisco–a city that once wanted to give shopping carts to the homeless–to celebrate and try to remember their dopey days of youth when so many of their musical heroes and friends long ago assumed room temperature by "partying" themselves to death. Nice.

While I salute and commend the political and cultural activism of the 1960s that fueled the civil rights movement, other than that, the decade is barren of any positive cultural or social impact. Honest people will remember 1967 for what is truly was.

There is a saying that if you can remember the 1960s, you were not there. I was there and remember the decade in vivid, ugly detail. I remember its toxic underbelly excess because I was caught in the vortex of the music revolution that was sweeping the country, and because my radar was fine-tuned thanks to a clean and sober lifestyle.

Death due to drugs and the social carnage heaped upon America by hippies is nothing to celebrate. That is a fool’s game, but it is quite apparent some burned-out hippies never learn.

I would like to try and write some of my personal feelings, musings, etc. on this subject, but I need still to find some real "quiet time" for that.
motherfucking awesome dude. ive decided to take this in another direction. It could take a long time to get a respectable quantity of musicians since I can’t devote a whole lot of time to this, but im starting a list of bands and their members. i will list what drugs are taken, and when they were taken (i.e. while playing music, while not playing music, drug use years 1965 – present, drug use 1970 – 1989 sober 1989 to present). References will be listed. Hopefully, in a few years ill have a pretty good list. I might start off by re-reading Motley Crue: The Dirt.
Not sure why you’re doing this, are you trying to prove to yourself that drugs make music better?

Any imbecile who doesn’t hump a bible on a daily basis knows that they do.

at first I was, but now i really just wish there was more information on the subject in general. id like to go into it as open minded as possible.
No mention of Frank Zappa? He’s quite the oxymoron–everyone thinks he did drugs based off his wild music. I never could get into it much, sober or not.

That was great to learn that he wasn’t very high on drugs; pardon the expression.

These are a few quick references to Zappa and drugs that I found.

Inside the head of Frank Zappa
By Adam Dunn
Dec 8, 2004

He didn’t indulge in drugs or alcohol, but could spend hours or days in the studio, living on coffee and cigarettes, often at the expense of his family while he ironed out project after project…

This next writer seems to look like he knows what he’s talking about. Looks like anyway, however that may be helpful.

Rock and roll entrepreneur
By Nick Gillespie
Apr 2005

A devotee of the sexual revolution, he remained in many ways an unreconstructed, 1950s male chauvinist pig. Located at the center of drug culture in the ’60s and ’70s, he loathed drugs and had little respect for even casual users…

Frank Zappa purportedly asked George to leave the Mothers of Invention because he wrote a song about drug use against Zappa’s wishes…

BTW, I’ve posted a bunch of great Zappa songs in the OT Tunes thread called "Frankly Zappa."

you obviously were on drugs when you thought of this idea

Well complex music such as drum lines and symphonies really cant be done on drugs, stuff non musicians generally dont care to listen to because its not as artistic or doesn’t appeal to the emotions as much. Its about complexity, synchronization, tempo, etc… However, stuff intended to dance to or to appeal to certain emotions, in general, are better due to drugs because they inspire creativity.
I loved Frank Zappa’s expression when he said, "How cool can you possibly be after you stick that stuff up your nose?"

Good luck.

Music and drugs are like sex and drugs. Its cool sober but when you’re fucked up you can do it 10 times better.

bullshit
maybe it sounds better but ur ability to do anything constructive when under the influence is diminished.. just another hipster stereotype

and as for sex, obviously u’ve never heard of whiskey dick or coke dick

bullshit
maybe it sounds better but ur ability to do anything constructive when under the influence is diminished.. just another hipster stereotype

and as for sex, obviously u’ve never heard of whiskey dick or coke dick

So why is it that most widely recognized and accredited artists in popular culture throughout history were on some sort of drug, often wrote on drugs, and often played on drugs.

You obviously didn’t read the thread

Hell, popular music has followed the changes in popular drug consumption throughout history.
The replies aren’t that great, but if you’re really interested in this subject, this is a thread about it called, "Marijuana use and its artistic effects on the mind… Myth or Fact?"

Unsureprophet believes it can help a band to kick out a whole album just like that:

I know Aerosmith made an entire album when they where high and drunk. The whole album!

When I’ve smoked it’s helped me to look at a certain topics from a different perspectives.

The replies aren’t that great, but if you’re really interested in this subject, this is a thread about it called, "Marijuana use and its artistic effects on the mind… Myth or Fact?"

Unsureprophet believes it can help a band to kick out a whole album just like that:

To me it seems like Marijuana slows down my mind so I can pay more attention to minute details.

My sober mind is always running 1000 miles per hour.

But at your link a couple posts up. "He didn’t indulge in drugs, he just got strung out on caffeine and nicotine." Both drugs drastically increase concentration.

To me it seems like Marijuana slows down my mind so I can pay more attention to minute details.

My sober mind is always running 1000 miles per hour.

But at your link a couple posts up. "He didn’t indulge in drugs, he just got strung out on caffeine and nicotine." Both drugs drastically increase concentration.

Check out that thoughts’ thread now.

So why is it that most widely recognized and accredited artists in popular culture throughout history were on some sort of drug, often wrote on drugs, and often played on drugs.

You obviously didn’t read the thread

i believe it was IN SPITE of the drugs, not because of them.

and where the hell do you draw the line between "stuff" and "music that musicians find to be creative"???

and music to dance to? like what, dance music? house, trance? which these days is done almost entirely on the computer… dont get me wrong, i love my vodka redbull and joints as much as the next guy when it comes to clubbing, makes any POS track sound awesome, but i dont know if i could concentrate enough to sit down and compose something that would sound good to non-fucked up people

although to be fair i havent really done much of strong stimulants like coke, which should make you smarter (?) and more focused at least until they wear off

What did Frank mean by this song from his album, Man From Utopia?

The disc opens with Cocaine Decisions, a bluesy rock song (with the blues feeling coming largely from an intermittent harmonica line). The lyrics are about how many of the top movers and shakers in the world make their important decisions while their brains are clouded with cocaine. I particularly like Zappa’s theory that this is why Hollywood keeps turning out so much "expensive ugliness".

Are you serious? You’re either dumb as a rock or trolling the troll, sublimes lead singer died from a heroin overdose and james hetfield has been in and out of alcohol rehab for years now.